After the Wall: Design since 1989

After the Wall: Design since 1989

26.10.2019 – 23.02.2020

Vitra Schaudepot

Thirty years after the historic fall of the Berlin Wall, the Vitra Design Museum presents »After the Wall: Design since 1989« at the Vitra Schaudepot. Organized on the occasion of the museum’s own 30th anniversary, the exhibition charts design from the past three decades, examining how it has been shaped by broad technological, cultural, and socio-political shifts. The exhibition juxtaposes iconic product design and graphic design with works by leading furniture designers and retailers including Jasper Morrison, Philippe Starck, Hella Jongerius, Muji, and IKEA, as well as up-and-coming contemporary designers.

Opening: 25 October 2019, 6:30 pm

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Image:
Tejo Remy, You Can’t Lay Down Your Memory, 1991
© Vitra Design Museum, Foto: Jürgen HANS

After the Wall: Design since 1989

Objects of Desire: Surrealism and Design 1924 – Today

Objects of Desire: Surrealism and Design 1924 – Today

28.09.2019 – 19.01.2020

Vitra Design Museum

Surrealism was one of the most influential art movements of the twentieth century. Everyday objects played a central role in its dreamlike imagery: they were alienated, ironized, or combined to create curious hybrids. This led to the creation of numerous key works of modern art, from Marcel Duchamp’s »Bicycle Wheel« (1913) to Salvador Dalí’s »Lobster Telephone« (1936). In reverse, Surrealism also exerced a decisive influence on the evolution of design. On 28 September 2019 the Vitra Design Museum will open a major exhibition that offers a comprehensive look at the dialogue between Surrealism and design. For the first time, it will unveil the extent to which Surrealism has influenced design of the past 100 years – from furniture and interiors to graphic design, fashion, and photography. The exhibition will include works by Gae Aulenti, BLESS, Achille Castiglioni, Giorgio de Chirico, Le Corbusier, Salvador Dalí, Dunne & Raby, Marcel Duchamp, Max Ernst, Ray Eames, Front, Frederick Kiesler, Shiro Kuramata, René Magritte, Carlo Mollino, Isamu Noguchi, Meret Oppenheim, Man Ray, Iris van Herpen, and many others.

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Image:
Daniel Streat/Visual Fields, Bocca sofa: © Studio65/Gufram, photo: Jürgen HANS © Vitra Design Museum

Objects of Desire: 
Surrealism and Design 1924 – Today

The Vitra Design Museum Collection

The Vitra Design Museum Collection

Permanent exhibition

Vitra Schaudepot

At the Vitra Schaudepot, which is designed by Herzog & de Meuron, the Vitra Design Museum presents key objects from its extensive collection, creating one of the largest permanent exhibitions and research sites on contemporary furniture design. Today the collection of the Vitra Design Museum encompasses a total of around 20 000 objects, with some 7000 pieces of furniture, more than 1000 lighting objects and numerous archives, as well as the Collection of the Eames Office, or the estates of Verner Panton and Alexander Girard. Although the main museum building by Frank Gehry (1989) was originally conceived to house the collection, the museum utilises the space to stage major temporary exhibitions. The construction of the Schaudepot allows for a permanent presentation of the collection, while offering a diverse educational programme.

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The Vitra Design Museum Collection

Black Box. A Cabinet of Robotic Curiosities

Black Box. A Cabinet of Robotic Curiosities

Visitors can experience the Black Box exclusively as part of a public guided tour. Registration: info(at)design-museum.de, max. 10 participants.

The Vitra Campus has a exhibition space: in one of the houses at the southern entrance, a Black Box has been installed which holds the collection of international toy robots belonging to Vitra Chairman Emeritus Rolf Fehlbaum. The presentation encompasses robots and figures of astronauts from the years 1937 to 1968. Many of them bear witness to the technological optimism of an age, when robotics and space travel were still largely fiction. Some of the selected objects are shown with the original packaging, which is often no less spectacular than the artefacts themselves. A number of the robots are seen in motion on video screens, while others are exhibited on turntable displays. The staging of the objects draws the viewer into a dark, minimalist dream world. The exhibition was conceived in collaboration with Fifo Stricker, Rolf Fehlbaum’s friend and fellow collector. Dieter Thiel designed the architecture of the Black Box, and the scenography was developed together with French designer Ronan Bouroullec.

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Black Box. A Cabinet of Robotic Curiosities