Typology: An Ongoing Study of Everyday Items

Typology: An Ongoing Study of Everyday Items

07.12.2019 – 03.05.2020

Vitra Design Museum Gallery

Not all objects are designed by professional designers. Many authorless everyday objects have continuously evolved in their form, function and materiality over the centuries. Some changed only in detail, others underwent rapid modifications triggered by social, political or technological upheavals. Fascinated by the processes that shape and change everyday objects, the French design collective »Collections Typologie« explores the history, production, and formal language of objects such as wine bottles, cork stoppers, or the metal balls used in boules or pétanque. The exhibition »Typology: An Ongoing Study of Everyday Items« at the Vitra Design Museum Gallery presents the results of their research, including their newest work on wooden crates. The collective's unique perspective invites us to take a fresh look at previously ignored parts of our object culture and encourages us to question our relationship to everyday objects – especially in the light of current debates on resource consumption and lifestyle choices.

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Image:
Collections Typologie and Anniina Koivu, Typologie – the cork stopper and the wine bottle, 2019 © Francesco Carreda

Typology: An Ongoing Study of Everyday Items

After the Wall: Design since 1989

After the Wall: Design since 1989

26.10.2019 – 23.02.2020

Vitra Schaudepot

Thirty years after the historic fall of the Berlin Wall, the Vitra Design Museum presents »After the Wall: Design since 1989« at the Vitra Schaudepot. Organized on the occasion of the museum’s own 30th anniversary, the exhibition charts design from the past three decades, examining how it has been shaped by broad technological, cultural, and socio-political shifts. The exhibition juxtaposes iconic product design and graphic design with works by leading furniture designers and retailers including Jasper Morrison, Philippe Starck, Hella Jongerius, Muji, and IKEA, as well as up-and-coming contemporary designers.

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Image:
Tejo Remy, You Can’t Lay Down Your Memory, 1991
© Vitra Design Museum, Foto: Jürgen HANS

After the Wall: Design since 1989

The Vitra Design Museum Collection

The Vitra Design Museum Collection

Permanent exhibition

Vitra Schaudepot

At the Vitra Schaudepot, which is designed by Herzog & de Meuron, the Vitra Design Museum presents key objects from its extensive collection, creating one of the largest permanent exhibitions and research sites on contemporary furniture design. Today the collection of the Vitra Design Museum encompasses a total of around 20 000 objects, with some 7000 pieces of furniture, more than 1000 lighting objects and numerous archives, as well as the Collection of the Eames Office, or the estates of Verner Panton and Alexander Girard. Although the main museum building by Frank Gehry (1989) was originally conceived to house the collection, the museum utilises the space to stage major temporary exhibitions. The construction of the Schaudepot allows for a permanent presentation of the collection, while offering a diverse educational programme.

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The Vitra Design Museum Collection

Black Box. A Cabinet of Robotic Curiosities

Black Box. A Cabinet of Robotic Curiosities

Visitors can experience the Black Box exclusively as part of a public guided tour. Registration: info(at)design-museum.de, max. 10 participants.

The Vitra Campus has a exhibition space: in one of the houses at the southern entrance, a Black Box has been installed which holds the collection of international toy robots belonging to Vitra Chairman Emeritus Rolf Fehlbaum. The presentation encompasses robots and figures of astronauts from the years 1937 to 1968. Many of them bear witness to the technological optimism of an age, when robotics and space travel were still largely fiction. Some of the selected objects are shown with the original packaging, which is often no less spectacular than the artefacts themselves. A number of the robots are seen in motion on video screens, while others are exhibited on turntable displays. The staging of the objects draws the viewer into a dark, minimalist dream world. The exhibition was conceived in collaboration with Fifo Stricker, Rolf Fehlbaum’s friend and fellow collector. Dieter Thiel designed the architecture of the Black Box, and the scenography was developed together with French designer Ronan Bouroullec.

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Black Box. A Cabinet of Robotic Curiosities